Community Project Funding

OVERVIEW

Community project funding requests are congressionally directed spending requests submitted by Members of Congress for their respective congressional districts to the Committee on Appropriations for potential inclusion in the appropriations process. Each request must meet strict eligibility guidelines set by the House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations. Specifically, requests need to follow the guidelines from the subcommittee of jurisdiction within the Appropriations Committee. In addition, requests must demonstrate strong community support. House regulations require that Members certify no financial interest for the Member or their immediate family in community project funding requests. Representative Guthrie has certified that none of the requests he has submitted for Second District projects have financial ties to him or his immediate family.

PROJECTS
In alphabetical order by city where project is located

Fiscal Year 2025

Project Name: Meade County Water District System Upgrades
Intended Recipient: Meade County Water District
Address of the Project: 1003 Armory Place, Brandenburg, KY 40108
Requested Amount:  $2,130,750
Member Certification Letter

Project Summary:
This project will help provide a higher quality supply of water in the oldest section of Meade County Water District’s system. The current lines serving customers from this system are primarily composed of asbestos concrete (A/C) piping, which is prone to frequent leaks and require significant resources to maintain and repair any damage to the piping, ultimately causing disruptions in service for local residents. This project is a good use of taxpayer funding because it seeks to improve water systems from the frequent disruptions currently experienced by Meade County residents and will improve water quality for residents throughout the county.

Project Name: Clarkson Wastewater Treatment Plant Expansion
Intended Recipient: City of Clarkson
Address of the Project: 213 Millerstown Street, P.O. Box 10, Clarkson, KY 42726
Requested Amount: $1,500,000
Member Certification Letter

Project Summary:
The proposed project will increase the capabilities of the wastewater treatment plant. The improved treatment and additional water capacity will bring the Meade County Water District into compliance with current permitting requirements and environmental regulations, ultimately allowing the City of Clarkson to service a larger number of residents in the area with clean water. This project is a good use of taxpayer funding because it will allow the City of Clarkson to serve a greater amount of future residents in their growing service area as well as increase water quality for current residents.  

Project Name: ARAC Aviation Support Facility
Intended Recipient: U.S. Army Reserve - Fort Knox  
Address of the Project: 1160 Brandenburg Station Rd. Fort Knox, KY 40121
Requested Amount: $138,000,000
Member Certification Letter

Project Summary:
This project is needed to construct a new maintenance hangar to support the Army Reserve rotary wing aviation maintenance mission at Fort Knox. This facility will provide the 8th BN, 229th Aviation Regiment (ASSAULT)(UH-60), and portions of 5th BN, 159th Aviation Regiment with an appropriate facility for its rotary wing aviation maintenance mission. Current facilities are in poor condition and cannot be fixed through routine renovation or repair.

This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will help construct a new maintenance hangar to ensure that the 8th BN, 229th Aviation Regiment (ASSAULT)(UH-60) will continue to execute on their mission of aviation maintenance for the U.S. Army and other similar aircraft. By upgrading these facilities, we can ensure that our soldiers are in the best possible position to carry out their duties and serve their country.

 Project Name: New Haven Water Line Asbestos Removal
Intended Recipient: LaRue County Water District
Address of the Project: 421 Strange Road, Hodgenville, KY 42748
Requested Amount:  $1,350,000
Member Certification Letter

Project Summary:
This project will allow the LaRue County Water District to replace approximately 4,500 linear feet of existing asbestos cement water lines in the City of New Haven with a six-inch PVC pipe for the lines they service within the city.  LaRue County Water District has aging and legacy infrastructure that no longer meets current water standards and must be replaced for safe and effective water usage in the coming years. This project is a good use of taxpayer funding because it allows LaRue County Water district to upgrade current systems to meet Kentucky water standards and ensure safe and effective water usage for Kentuckians.

Project Name: Upton Water Tank Construction
Intended Recipient: LaRue County Water District
Address of the Project: 421 Strange Road, Hodgenville, KY 42748
Requested Amount: $2,400,000
Member Certification Letter

Project Summary:
This project would allow construction of a new 500,000 gallon water tank and pump station to serve an unserved area in Upton, Kentucky. Population growth in the area is creating greater infrastructure demands, making it harder for the LaRue County Water District to meet local demands without disruptions in service to residents. The project is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because this project will decrease service interruptions due to high demand from growth and increase the quality of service to residential customers with improved pressure and volume.

Project Name: Lewisport New Water Treatment Plant  
Intended Recipient: City of Lewisport Municipal Water Works
Address of the Project: 405 Second Street, Lewisport, KY 42351
Requested Amount: $2,000,000
Member Certification Letter

Project Summary:
This project would construct a new .50 MGD (millions of gallons per day) regional Water Treatment Plant that will help to ensure long-term quality service for all Lewisport citizens and to households outside of the city limits that the plant services. This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it would replace a water treatment plant that is nearing the end of its useful life and would also serve as a new regional water treatment plant that would serve the customers of Lewisport. It would also serve Hancock County and neighboring counties in emergency situations. The new Water Treatment Plant would ensure that Lewisport is meeting clean drinking water standards and other relevant laws and regulations, including PFAS regulations. The new plant would incorporate the use of technologies and practices for conservation and reuse efforts, water loss reduction and prevention, and protection of water resources for the future. These would include installation of water efficient devices, such as plumbing fixtures and appliances, and the installation of water meters with AMR or smart meters with leak detection and backflow prevention on all processes.

Fiscal Year 2024

Project Name: School Resource Officers’ Emergency Response Radio System
Intended Recipient: Warren County Sheriff’s Office
Address of the Project: 429 East 10th Street, Suite 102 (PO Box 807), Bowling Green, KY, 42102
Requested Amount: $571,510
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
Emergency response radio system coverage assessments conducted in Warren County Public Schools (WCPS), to date, show a critical need to upgrade the emergency response radio system to an 800 MHz Distributed Antenna System (DAS). Warren County Public Schools is the fourth largest and fastest growing district in the Commonwealth and the third largest employer in Warren County. The Warren County Sheriff’s Office is requesting funding to support the upgrade so that the 12 School Resource Officers (SROs) charged with protecting students and staff can make contact with other law enforcement agencies and area first responders to execute a collaborative and efficient school emergency response, which can potentially save lives. The measurable objectives for this project are to upgrade the emergency response radio system in three WCPS high schools and four middle schools that are in high need of this system. This would help the SROs execute on-site calls through radio dispatch to request backup from law enforcement and first responder agencies, such as the Kentucky State Police, Bowling Green Police Department, Bowling Green Fire Department, and area emergency medical services.

This project includes the purchase of equipment, engineering services, installation services, project management and testing, and system monitoring and maintenance. This project is valuable use of taxpayer funds because it would help promote the safety of students and staff.

Project Name: Rehabilitate Terminal Apron at Bowling Green-Warren County Regional Airport (BWG)
Intended Recipient: Bowling Green-Warren County Regional Airport (BWG)
Address of the Project: 1000 Woodhurst Dr, Suite 210, Bowling Green, KY, 42103
Requested Amount: $1,012,500
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
The funding for this project would be used for construction costs to rehabilitate the western portion of the terminal apron that serves the general aviation community. The asphalt apron pavement surrounding the general aviation hangars located near the Fixed Base Operator (FBO) terminal is in severe need of rehabilitation as indicated by the 2018 Pavement Condition Index (PCI) study performed by the Kentucky Department of Aviation; with pavement condition indices ranging from 39 to 51, the pavement will soon be past the point of rehabilitation. BWG would like to perform joint sealing of wide fractures and mill and bituminous overlay of this pavement. BWG also would like to implement water quality measures, which will require the use of a water quality unit and excavation of a new detention basin.

The project is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because there have been widespread safety concerns about Foreign Object Debris (FOD) causing damage to aircraft and ground vehicles. The existing asphalt pavement has become uneven over the past several years, which has caused the creation of numerous ponding water areas that have become a wildlife attraction. Lastly, with the uneven pavement surfaces and extensive cracking, the rideability of this section of the Terminal Apron is harsh and imposes a taxi hazard for the aircrafts. This funding would help improve the safety concerns for staff and tenants and would improve the accessibility of the terminal apron.

Project Name: Wax Water Treatment Plant and Intake Dredging Project
Intended Recipient: Edmonson County Water District
Address of the Project: 1128 Highway 259 North (PO Box 208), Brownsville, KY, 42210
Requested Amount:  $4,519,524
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

This community project funding would be used to build a new water intake plant on a more stable area of the lake. This would help maintain reliable service to existing customers. Increased capacity is also needed in order to meet the high customer demands due to agricultural production, increased ecotourism, and new home construction. The new and expanded water transmission lines would allow for increased pumping rates and furnish the required quantity of water needed to meet the existing, as well as the future, demands in the system.

The project is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because these upgrades would help ensure that the Edmonson County Water District can continue to provide water service and supply clean, safe, and potable drinking water to its customers in Hart, Edmonson, and Grayson counties.

Project Name: Beech Grove Water System Storage Tank Addition
Intended Recipient: Beech Grove Water Association
Address of the Project: 445 Hwy. 56 North, Calhoun, KY 42327
Requested Amount: $1,941,968
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
This project involves the construction of a new 250,000-gallon water tank to be constructed adjacent to the existing Wrightsburg Hill Tank for the Beech Grove Water Association. Replacement of the existing pump station is also proposed in order to fill the proposed tank and to strengthen the system. Approximately 5,150 linear feet of new 6-inch water main is also required along KY HWY 256 in order to provide adequate water supply to the proposed tank. The proposed project would satisfy the requirements of the delinquency notice supplied to Beech Grove by the Public Service Commission on February 22, 2010. This notice requires that a 24-hour hold period be secured prior to November 30, 2014. The new water tank project has been at the forefront of need for Beech Grove since the delinquency notice issued in 2010. Currently, employees of the Association must manipulate the distribution system in order to provide adequate water pressure to all customers. The customers served by this system include many poultry operations, which regularly require large volumes of water. To supply this volume, operators must open and close valves throughout the system on a daily basis to supply the pressure and volume needed. This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the new storage tank and its replacement would provide all customers of the utility with adequate water supply and pressure without constant manipulation of the system.

Project Name: Rehabilitate Airfield Lighting, Glasgow Airport (GLW), Glasgow, KY
Intended Recipient: Glasgow Municipal Airport (GLW)
Address of the Project: 390 Airport Rd, Glasgow, KY, 42141
Requested Amount: $750,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
The funding would be used to replace airfield lighting at Glasgow Airport (GLW). The current airfield lighting was installed in 2001 and has exceeded its useful life of 12 years. Due to its age, replacement parts are increasingly harder to find. Some parts are no longer available, and the airport must find parts from other airports that had the same system.

The project is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the new lighting system would increase safety and reliability of airport operations. The new modern system would be LED and would cut electric usage by half. Spare and replacement parts would also be more readily available.

Project Name: Grayson County Sheriff’s Office Community Response & Safeguard Initiative
Intended Recipient: Grayson County Sheriff’s Office
Address of the Project: 117 S. Main Street, Leitchfield, KY 42754
Requested Amount: $300,924
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

Grayson County, Kentucky encompasses 511 square miles with a population of 26,420. Grayson County Sheriff’s Office is responsible for 90% of the calls for service and criminal investigations. Grayson County Sheriff’s Office currently has 11 deputies (including the Sheriff) that respond to calls. In addition to the sworn deputies, the Sheriff’s office is also required by statute to provide security for the local Judicial Center. The Grayson County Sheriff’s Office Community Response & Safeguard Initiative includes new tasers and a police cruiser. The Sheriff’s office currently uses TASER X26s and X26Ps, which were respectively released in 2003 and 2013, and Axon, the company that manufactures TASER, no longer supplies or offers maintenance on these products. Police cruisers typically withstand 3-5 years of service averaging 100,000-150,000 miles. Once a Police Cruiser reaches these maximums, the cost efficiency is significantly reduced because warranties expire and wear-and-tear on the vehicle will require parts to be replaced. Grayson County is a rural community with numerous back roads that often cause damage to vehicles while deputies are responding to emergency situations. This project is an appropriate use of taxpayer dollars because this will replace outdated equipment that the Sheriff’s office needs to safeguard public safety.

Project Name: Expansion of TJ Samson Health Pavilion
Intended Recipient: TJ Regional Health
Address of the Project: 1301 N. Race Street, Glasgow, KY 42144
Requested Amount: $2,100,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
The T.J. Health Pavilion opened in 2013 to house expanded services provided by TJ Regional Health in Glasgow, Kentucky. This additional facility (located at 310 N L Rogers Wells Blvd, Glasgow, KY 42141) currently has no debt, was paid for with private funds and bonds, and currently only has two finished floors. After nearly 10 years, the medical practices in the Pavilion have grown beyond capacity of the two finished floors. The T.J. Women’s Health Clinic has one of the highest daily volumes of all of the clinics within the Pavilion. This project is a valuable use of taxpayer dollars because additional space is urgently needed to accommodate new providers and increasing patient volumes. The practice has added three new providers within the last six months. The most recent addition was placed in a primary care clinic on the first floor because there is no more available space on the second floor that houses the Women’s Health Clinic. The T.J. Health Pavilion houses a variety of primary care and specialty clinics. The unfinished third floor of the Pavilion would add approximately 31,000 square feet of additional capacity and is a prime location to create a larger clinic space for the high-priority Women’s Health team and to add new service lines, including Psychiatry. Additionally, this area could provide needed space to accommodate administrative needs for the building, including medical offices, waiting areas, public restrooms, and environmental and mechanical services and needs for the facility.

Project Name: Muhlenberg County Landfill Development Project
Intended Recipient: Muhlenberg County Fiscal Court
Address of the Project: 1100 Landfill Road, Graham, KY 42344
Requested Amount: $3,751,544.75
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
This request would commission a landfill in Muhlenberg County, KY. Currently, Muhlenberg County does not have a landfill and transports all waste to neighboring counties. Further, the number of illegal dumps in the region has been increasing dramatically over recent years. This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the creation of a landfill in Muhlenberg County would be beneficial to the local governments and citizens. This would help alleviate the cost burden of waste disposal and cleanup of illegal dumps for the local governments. Citizens that currently dispose of household waste and construction/storm debris in neighboring landfills and those that have to clean up their properties from illegal dumps would also benefit from this project. The development of a landfill would allow easier access to the disposal of not only household waste, but also construction and storm debris. Solid waste disposal is a vital service for communities to maintain a healthy and environmentally friendly atmosphere. The proposed site of the landfill is on a 10-acre abandoned mine land site that is adequately removed from populated areas in the county and has no other developable use.

Project Name: Greensburg Drinking Water Quality Improvement
Intended Recipient: City of Greensburg
Address of the Project: 1 South Depot Street, Greensburg, KY 42743
Requested Amount: $200,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
This project would replace approximately 10,000 linear feet of existing cast iron water piping and asbestos water lines and increase line sizes serving fire hydrants at key areas throughout the city. It would also upgrade the carbon delivery system at the treatment plant with placement of a dedicated 4” PVC line for carbon feeding. Additionally, this would help implement storage tank upgrades, including retro-fitting all tanks for top-fill to ensure better tank turnover for maximum freshness of drinking water and replacing existing altitude valves with electronically operated butterfly valves. Existing telemetry to control new valves would also be replaced while utilizing the existing vault valves. Further, this would provide for the acquisition of tools and equipment to ensure consistency of water production, safety of operators at the plant, and improvement of distribution system management capabilities. This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it would ensure that the 6,000 customers in the Greensburg water district in Green and Taylor counties have access to safe drinking water in accordance with the standards set forth in the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 and other federal regulations.

Project Name: Hardinsburg Water Treatment Plant Expansion Phase 1 and Distribution Improvements
Intended Recipient: City of Hardinsburg
Address of the Project: 4400 East Hwy 144, Hardinsburg, KY 40143
Requested Amount: $2,500,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
This project would increase the capacity of the Hardinsburg Water Treatment Plant, enabling the City to continue extending water lines throughout the remainder of Breckinridge County that currently do not have access to clean, safe drinking water. Federal funds would be used for engineering design, inspection, and construction costs of the project. Improvements in the distribution system would be undertaken to allow the increased amount of water to be pumped to various parts of the County. This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the water treatment plant expansion would allow the plant to supply the entire county by adding 5,000 new customers to the 7,000 customers it currently serves.

Project Name: Ohio County Water District Raw Water Intake Line Rebuilding
Intended Recipient: Ohio County Water District
Address of the Project: 124 East Washington Street, Hartford, KY 42347
Requested Amount: $2,000,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
The Ohio County Water District (OCWD) was chartered in 1962 and provides potable drinking water to customers in Ohio, Daviess, Breckinridge, McLean, and Grayson counties. This project would affect all 6,115 OCWD customers, including the cities of Beaver Dam, Centertown and Fordsville since these cities purchase water wholesale from the district. A new 4.0 MGD membrane type wastewater treatment plant was constructed and placed into service in 2011 utilizing the Green River as a source of raw water. The Green River is the only source of raw water utilized by the OCWD WTP and the existing raw water intake is the only facility that the OCWD can use to transport raw water to the existing WTP. The raw water intake supply line and pump station face serious issues that could result in complete loss of raw water supply to the OCWD. Due to the presence of large rocks in the intake wet well, apparent holes in the supply line, and riverbank slope instability, it was determined that improvements must be made. The presence of large rocks in the wet well will cause pump damage, pump failure, and ultimately loss of water supply. Another serious situation occurring at the intake is the apparent slope failure at the bank. As an attempt to keep the bank from sliding and eroding, sheet piling and restraint cable have been installed. Bank failure will act as a pulling force on the pipe leading to catastrophic pipe failure of the intake. This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the combination of the apparent hole in the intake supply line and bank retaining wall failure warrant action to protect the raw water supply for the customers of the OCWD.

Project Name: Hodgenville WWTP Upgrade & Wet Weather Storage
Intended Recipient:  City of Hodgenville
Address of the Project:  Sewer Plant Drive, Hodgenville, KY 42748
Requested Amount: $1,950,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
The City of Hodgenville serves 1,700 sewer customers and seeks federal funds to upgrade the existing wastewater treatment plant. Upgrades will include additional wet weather retention, additional treatment units, and updated treatment equipment. The improvements will be designed to ensure greater efficiency in treatment, reduced surcharging, and provide overflows at both the plant and adjacent lift stations. This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it would provide water services for the existing residents and businesses and accommodate future growth. More wastewater treatment capacity will be needed because of the economic development currently taking place in the region.

Project Name: Horse Cave Wastewater Treatment Plant
Intended Recipient: Caveland Environmental Authority
Address of the Project: 100 Sewage Plant Street, Horse Cave, KY, 42749
Requested Amount: $1,920,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
The funding for this project would be used to expand the Horse Cave, Kentucky Wastewater Treatment Plant by installing a new clarifier. The Caveland Environmental Authority allows industrial growth in its service area, which has maxed out the Horse Cave Treatment Plant capacity.

The project is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because Caveland Environmental Authority is a very aggressive utility installation wastewater system that protects Mammoth Cave National Park’s cave system. Caveland Environmental needs to continue connecting and improving Wastewater services to protect the environment and support growth in the area, especially with the new establishment of the battery manufacturing facility.

Project Name: City of Lewisport New Water Treatment Plant
Intended Recipient:  City of Lewisport Municipal Water Works
Address of the Project:  Community Center Drive, Lewisport, KY 42351
Requested Amount: $2,000,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
This project would construct a new .50 MGD regional Water Treatment Plant that will help to ensure long-term quality service for all Lewisport citizens and to households outside of the city limits that the plant services. This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it would replace a water treatment plant that is nearing the end of its useful life and would also serve as a new regional water treatment plant that would serve the customers of Lewisport. It would also serve Hancock County and neighboring counties in emergency situations. The new Water Treatment Plant would ensure that Lewisport is meeting clean drinking water standards and other relevant laws and regulations, including PFAS regulations. The new plant would incorporate the use of technologies and practices for conservation and reuse efforts, water loss reduction and prevention, and protection of water resources for the future. These would include installation of water efficient devices, such as plumbing fixtures and appliances, and the installation of water meters with AMR or smart meters with leak detection and backflow prevention on all processes.

Project Name: Runway 18/36 LED Lighting Project, OWB, Owensboro, KY
Intended Recipient: Owensboro-Daviess County Regional Airport (OWB)
Address of the Project: 2200 Airport Road, Owensboro, KY, 42301
Requested Amount: $2,375,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

This project would replace obsolete and costly incandescent runway lighting with high efficiency LED lighting for the airport’s main runway.  This would reduce the carbon footprint of the airport, save taxpayer money, and allow the airport to better serve its two commercial air carriers, emergency services, law enforcement, and both tenant and transient general aviation customers. The airport’s current incandescent lighting system is energy inefficient, maintenance intensive, and effectively inferior regarding safe airport operations. Further, it has far exceeded useful life standards set forth by the FAA. 

The project is an appropriate use of taxpayer funds because the airport’s new lighting system would enhance safety and usability of the airport as well as deliver benefits, such as reduced operational costs and reduced environmental impact.  In addition to saving the airport thousands of dollars a year on utility bills, it would also significantly decrease routine maintenance costs of expensive and frequent bulb replacement. Further, this would extend the life of transformers and other electrical supply facilities.

Fiscal Year 2023

Project Name: Flaget Memorial Hospital Nurse Call System
Intended Recipient: Flaget Memorial Hospital Foundation
Address of the Project: 4305 New Shepherdsville Rd, Bardstown, KY 40004
Requested Amount: $638,944.20
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

Flaget Memorial Hospital is located in Bardstown, KY, and serves seven surrounding counties in the Commonwealth. Flaget Hospital provides end-to-end health care from cancer treatment, specialized cardiac care, behavioral health care, and trauma care. Flaget Memorial Hospital currently utilizes the Responder IV Nurse Call System that is over 20 years old and can no longer be serviced when repairs are needed. The Responder IV was introduced in 1996 and was retired by the manufacturer in October 2015. The provider was notified in December of 2021 that they will no longer have a vendor who can provide service when the unit fails.  The current patient/nurse communication system at Flaget Memorial also puts patients at risk, particularly seniors. The capabilities and needs of elderly and disabled patients are increasingly complicated by serious illnesses, dementia and comorbid conditions, making it difficult for them to operate the current call system. This project will fund the next-generation of Nurse Call Systems which utilizes wireless, connected technologies, such as body-worn sensors, to detect unattended events and hazardous situations. This helps patients avoid unnecessary falls or other serious bodily injury.

This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the current system puts patients at risk, cannot be repaired, and is outdated. An upgraded Nurse Call System would also support timely treatment and quality of health care services. The provider serves over 81,000 patients annually that would benefit from improved patient/nurse communications.

Project Name: Town Creek WWTP Reactor & Clarifier Upgrades
Proposed Recipient: City of Bardstown
Address of Recipient: 220 N. Fifth Street, Bardstown, KY  40004
Requested Amount: $2,000,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

Bardstown, KY, is located in Nelson County, KY, and has a population of about 13,000 people. The City of Bardstown is requesting assistance to make necessary upgrades to the Town Creek Treatment Plant, which is currently permitted at 3MGD, and needs to urgently be expanded to 4MGD due to increased demand. Additionally, the current rectangular clarifier is obsolete and doesn’t function properly, and is potentially putting residents at risk because it can no longer effectively remove ammonia. The City of Bardstown is experiencing rapid growth in residential and industry that flows to this plant. As a growing community, Bardstown needs to be ready and able to accommodate the treatment needs of the community and to support the local economy. This is a good use of taxpayer dollars because it will protect the health of the Bardstown community, pave the way for growth and increased jobs, and help the environment by improving the currently system in addition to helping support the local economy.

Project Name: Hart County – Bonnieville Industrial Development site
Intended Recipient: Hart County Fiscal Court
Address of the Project: 557 Bacon Creek Road, Bonnieville, KY 42713
Requested Amount: $1,800,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

This project would enhance the economic development of South Central Kentucky area being located close to the major battery park at Glendale, Kentucky.  It is also only 45 miles to the new battery facility located in industrial development Bowling Green, Kentucky.  This project would develop a 109-acre tract into a build ready site that will involve a sewer and water extension project along with excavation.

This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide economic development in a location that currently lacks development. This project is positioned well to significantly impact not only the north end of Warren County, but also the south side of Hardin and LaRue counties. 

Project Name: Research Equipment Upgrades for the Applied Research and Technology Program Centers at WKU
Intended Recipient: Western Kentucky University
Address of the Project: Western Kentucky University 1906 College Heights Blvd. Bowling Green, KY 42101 and Western Kentucky University Innovation Campus 2413 Nashville Road Bowling Green, KY 42101
Requested Amount: $460,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

This project, located at Western Kentucky University (WKU), would replace and upgrade aging equipment in the most active research centers of the WKU Applied Research and Technology Program (ARTP). The purpose of this project is to: allow ARTP utilization to continue unabated, expand and improve the range of research facilitated by the centers, and provide modern equipment for training of students.

The WKU Applied Research and Technology Program (ARTP) is a multidisciplinary program consisting of 13 scientific and service-oriented Centers and Institutes designed to prepare students for the knowledge-based 21st Century global economy. At the heart of ARTP are shared, collaborative, modern scientific centers that provide unique opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to transition to the workplace or graduate programs through participation in supervised, hands-on applied research projects that solve real problems.

This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because ARTP is a shared research resource, which facilitates cutting-edge research by WKU faculty, staff, and students. It can also attract funding from federal, state, and private sources to fund potential innovative breakthroughs.

Project Name: City of Burgin Pre-Disaster Mitigation
Intended Recipient: City of Burgin
Address of the Project: S. Maple, Peach and S. Sycamore Streets, Burgin, KY 40310
Requested Amount: $750,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

The City of Burgin is experiencing flooding issues with up to 25% of its land mass being flooded more than nine times a year. This project would address this issue by building a floodwater management and storm sewer system to direct water away from the area of concern which consists mostly of low-income households and a significant minority population.

The project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because Burgin’s current situation leaves a significant portion of the city uninhabitable as it floods almost monthly. In addition to the significant impact on current residents, until the flooding abatement systems are installed, any development on the more than 200 acres of available land will not be possible, thus preventing future economic development opportunities and growth for the community.

Project Name: Danville-Boyle County Airport Entrance Road Relocation
Intended Recipient: City of Danville
Address of the Project:  420 Airport Road, Danville, KY 40422
Requested Amount: $1,250,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

Danville, Kentucky is a vibrant community with a growing manufacturing base and higher education footprint.  This project would construct a new entrance road that would be a city street to the east of the existing road to allow for expansion of the usable area for the movement of aircraft.  The city street would be constructed for multi-modal uses.  After construction, the City of Danville would take over long-term maintenance of the road to provide a pivotal service for the community.

The project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the relocation of the entrance would provide approximately 15 acres of additional on-air space for the airport to develop hangars and taxiways.  This additional on-air space would provide economic and mobility benefits by increasing capacity at the airport.  Another economic benefit from the project would be the potential to create industrial property to the east of the new road that could compliment airport activities.

Project Name: Trojan Trail/KY 249 Bridge Widening Project
Intended Recipient: Barren County Fiscal Court
Address of the Project:  Trojan Trail/KY 249, Glasgow, KY 42141
Requested Amount: $2,000,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

The growth of Glasgow and Barren County has led to increased traffic and safety concerns on this road, which serves schools and industry. This project would widen KY 249 due to safety concerns.  This project would extend safety improvements from Hilltopper Way down the hill to Trojan Trail by providing a turn lane and appropriate width across the bridge to accommodate the increase in freight movement. The 2019 traffic count along the roadway was 2,868 vehicles per day, including traffic from school buses for a middle and high school, and an extended campus for Western Kentucky University.

The project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because this project would improve road and pedestrian safety.  With the location of a middle school, high school, college campus, and new industry, the traffic count is much higher than when originally constructed.

Project Name: South Cooper Industrial Park Infrastructure
Intended Recipient: Barren County Fiscal Court
Address of the Project: 249 South Cooper Rd, Glasgow, KY 42141
Requested Amount: $1,000,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

Barren County is located along Interstate 65, which connects two neighboring communities that have both seen major economic development announcements related to the growth of electric vehicle manufacturing.  The announcements have triggered strong demand for industrial park space in this region. 

This project request is to support the extension of water and sewer to the South Cooper Industrial Park.  South Cooper Industrial Park began development in August of 2020 with the purchase of 152 acres for the purposes of economic development that will result in new capital investment, jobs, and tax revenues for the City of Glasgow and Barren County.  The requested funding would leverage the $2,320,000 that has been invested and an additional $5,700,000 planned development that includes internal roadway, infrastructure, and site preparation, such as grading. 

This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because Barren County needs this infrastructure to successfully and safely complete the development of this area.  The lack of water and sewer capacity has previously led to Barren County being overlooked for economic development opportunities.

Project Name: Lebanon Junction Pump Station  
Intended Recipient: City of Lebanon Junction
Address of the Project: Masden Street, Lebanon Junction, KY 40150
Requested Amount: $675,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

Lebanon Junction, Kentucky, is a rural community with a low-income population and limited means to mitigate future flooding disasters. This proposed project would construct a flood pump station to alleviate flooding that occurs within the existing flood wall due to topography of the watershed. Once constructed, this flood pump station would expel water that drains and is detained by the flood wall when Rolling Fork River is at flood stages. The project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it would provide a permanent solution to address flooding in Lebanon Junction.

Project Name: Daniels Lane to HWY 603 Intersection Waterline Upgrade     
Intended Recipient: Daviess County Water District
Address of the Project: Daniels Lane to HWY 603 Intersection, Owensboro, KY 42303
Requested Amount: $640,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

This project is focused on the east side of Owensboro and Daviess County, which is experiencing tremendous growth in all three areas of residential, commercial, and industrial expansion. The rapid development of this area has caused significant stress on the existing infrastructure due to increased demand for additional water capacity to support this growth. This area is currently served by an 8-inch water main, which is undersized to support this new increase in needed capacity. This project involves replacing 8,000 linear feet of 8-inch water main with 12-inch water main. This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because these improvements would allow for emergency water back feed to Owensboro Health and Daviess County Middle School, newly located in this area, and support storage requirements and future growth.

Project Name: Springfield City Barn Pump Station Replacement        
Intended Recipient: Springfield Water & Sewer Commission
Address of the Project: 1140 Lincoln Park Road, Springfield, KY 40069
Requested Amount: $1,399,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:

Springfield Water & Sewer Commission provides water and sewer service to residents of Springfield, Kentucky, and surrounding Washington County, a rural community. This project would replace an existing sewer lift station that is reaching its capacity with a larger lift station and would upsize the existing 4-inch force main to a 6-inch force main to accommodate growth in the area.  The station services a commercial area at the intersection and a residential area.  This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because continued growth in this area will soon exceed the capacity of the lift station and thus hamper future economic development and growth opportunities.


Fiscal year 2022

Project Name: Chapatcha Industrial Park Development
Intended Recipient: Barren County Fiscal Court  
Address of the Project: 110 Chapatcha Drive Cave City, Kentucky 42127
Requested Amount: $250,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
The Chapatcha Industrial Park is located in Cave City, Kentucky, a small town in Barren County. One of Cave City’s biggest economic drivers is tourism due to its location between Mammoth Cave National Park and the Cave City Convention Center. The city sits right along the I-65 corridor and has great access to Louisville and Nashville. To date, more than $1.5 million has been invested in the industrial park for infrastructure, clearing, and environmental testing. However, the infrastructure development and site work are not yet completed. Securing funding for the park would help with site development, grading and pad, site plan, preliminary building design, cost, and scheduling that will bring three 10-acre sites up to the Kentucky Build Ready Program standards for an industrial park. This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because this infrastructure development would help revitalize the community and create economic opportunities. This project would result in needed job creation and capital investment in the community.

Project Name: Spears Creek Pump Station
Intended Recipient: City of Danville, Kentucky
Address of the Project: 825 Hwy 2168 Danville, Kentucky 40422
Requested Amount: $400,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
This funding is being requested for a clean water project in Boyle County, Kentucky for much-needed improvements to the Spears Creek Pump Station. Specifically, this project entails replacing two pumps and variable frequency drives (VFDs), rehabilitating the wet well, and upgrading the electrical systems. The current pump is not adequate to handle the demands of the system and does not meet current sanitation standards. Further, the current pump has incurred significant repair costs over recent years. This project will provide an essential facility to the entire area around Herrington Lake in Boyle, Mercer, and Garrard counties. Additionally, the city expanded access to the public sanitary sewer by accepting wastewater from eastern Mercer County, due to the closing of the wastewater plant at North Point Training Center, a state prison.  The project also improves runoff and water quality on the east side of Lake Herrington. The additional capacity provided by this project will also foster economic growth for the north side of Danville. This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it would ensure the community continues to have access to clean water and a clean environment, provide cost savings for the city and its customers, and be compliant with the EPA. 

Project Name: The Med Center at Caverna Surgery Department, Bowling Green Warren County Community Hospital Corporation
Intended Recipient: The Medical Center at Caverna
Exact address of the Project: The Medical Center at Caverna, 1501 S. Dixie Street, Horse Cave, KY 42749
Requested Amount: $250,000
Member Certification Form
Project Summary:
This funding will be used to purchase surgery equipment for the surgery department of Med Center at Caverna (MCC), which will allow MCC to expand the types of surgeries that can be performed at this hospital in the rural community of Horse Cave, KY.  Med Center Health anticipates the most common procedures will include hernia surgery, hemorrhoid surgery, sebaceous cyst removal, PICC line placement, breast surgery, and other minor outpatient surgeries. MCC estimates that over 300 surgeries per year can be performed with an upgraded surgical department. This will allow patients in Hart County and the surrounding communities to have more surgical services performed closer to home. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will provide better access to health care, reduce travel time and expenses, and increase convenience for Kentuckians in this area.

Project Name: Breckinridge County: “Improve KY 86 from Jesse Priest Road to Rosetta Corners”
Intended Recipient: The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet
Address of the Project:  KY 86 MP 17.700 to 18.800 Jessie Priest Road to east of Rosetta Corners Road Irvington, Kentucky, 40146
Requested Amount: $1.6 million
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary:
KY 86 is the only east/west corridor across Breckinridge and Hardin counties. This particular project evolved from a 2017 state scoping study to address multiple accidents, including injuries and death from mainly single vehicles. The purpose of this project is to enhance mobility and provide a safer route to and from the regional connections between Hardinsburg, Cecilia, Elizabethtown, the Western Kentucky Parkway, and I-65. Many local citizens travel to work, major retail stores, manufacturing plants, and especially health care providers on this route. The long-term improvement option was recommended to realign the segment by replacing three of the horizontal curves with a single curve for this particular section between Jessie Priest Road and Rosetta Corners Road. The majority of this curvy highway has 9-foot wide lanes and 18-inch shoulders, including hills and limited distance sight not suitable for a main route. With the completion of a substantial industrial project in neighboring Meade County in the near future, the traffic count will increase drastically. The project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it would address the severe safety concerns and accessibility issues with this road. This road has been an impediment to the region. This project would improve the safety of this route for people commuting to schools, places of work, and homes.

Project Name: Lancaster Water Project
Intended Recipient: City of Lancaster, Kentucky
Address of the Project: 743 Water Works Road Lancaster, Kentucky 40444
Requested Amount: $400,000
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary: 
This funding will be used to help complete Lancaster’s new water treatment plant for drinking water. Specifically, this project would make improvements to raw water intake at the Kentucky River, provide for additional instrumentation and controls at the existing intermediated booster pump station, improve the pump motors at the existing intermediated booster pump station, upgrade the existing SCADA system for integration with the new water plant SCADA system, add a maintenance building at the new water plant, and give upgrades to the existing raw water pumps. The existing water plant has been operating for 80 years and has required extensive repairs, particularly as this community has grown over the years. A new facility is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because this project has been sorely needed to protect the community’s water system from catastrophic failure and ensure that the residents of Lancaster and Garrard County have reliable, clean water for years to come. 

Project Name: Baptist Health Medical Group Family Medicine Radcliff
Intended Recipient: Baptist Health Hardin
Exact Address of the Project: 1679 North Wilson Road, Suite 110, Radcliff, KY 40160
Requested Amount: $300,000
Member Certification Form
Project Summary:
Baptist Health Hardin (Hardin) cares for approximately 400,000 residents in 10 Central Kentucky counties (Breckinridge, Bullitt, Grayson, Green, Hardin, Hart, LaRue, Meade, Nelson, and Taylor). By volume Hardin ranks among the top 10 busiest hospitals in Kentucky overall. This project is specific to a clinic that is located right outside the fence of the Fort Knox Army installation in Radcliff, KY. Last year, Baptist Health Medical Group Family Medicine Radcliff cared for 4,173 patients with 30% of the patients covered by military insurance. This clinic commonly provides care to patients who struggle with behavioral issues (anxiety, depression, sleep disorders, drug and alcohol dependence, and more). This community project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it will support the development of a one-stop clinic to allow the community to receive multiple services under one roof. Additionally, it will provide critical care to the soldiers serving at Ft. Knox and their families, who now largely receive care in the community. This is due to a reduction in services provided on-post with Ireland Army Hospital being downgraded to a health clinic. Specifically, the $300,000 would pay for about half of the $617,511 of construction costs remaining to complete the clinic expansion.

Project Name: Washington County: “Improve U.S. 150 from KY 1872 to Mayfield Lane”
Intended Recipient: The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet
Address of the Project: 2.08-mile section of U.S. 150 from west of Old Fredericktown-Bardstown Road (KY-1872) to 0.7 miles east of Grundy Home Road Springfield, Kentucky, 40069
Requested Amount:  $1.7 million
Member Certification Letter
Project Summary: 
Springfield, Kentucky is a rural community, which sits along U.S. 150 with limited interstate access. The section from KY 1872 to Mayfield Lane along U.S. 150 is one of the most heavily traveled roads in Washington County with 20 percent of the traffic representing single and combo trucks. U.S. 150 is integrated along the Bourbon Trail, which these trucks frequently utilize when transporting distilled goods. This section of U.S. 150 does not meet the criteria for the 55-mph design speed due to no passing lanes, narrow shoulder widths, and multiple horizonal and vertical curves. Residents in this area greatly rely on U.S. 150 to commute to work and travel to health care facilities. Road expansion and safety improvements would have significant economic benefits and also would provide current and future manufacturing and health care industries a safer and quicker route. This project would not only provide a safer roadway for travelers, but also an improved link to interstate access for I-65 and the Bluegrass Parkway. This would have an immeasurable economic impact to all of central Kentucky. This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it would allow a safer roadway for travelers, improve connection to interstate access for I-65 and the Bluegrass Parkway, and create economic opportunities.